As A Speaker, Remember It’s Not About You

The link below is a cool link about being a speaker. The author gives you 7 concepts and I’d like to add one more. Remember, it’s not about you. Too many speakers are all about what they have to say instead of recognizing it’s all about the audience. What does the audience need? What benefit are you giving to your audience? What do you want them to do with your material when you finish talking? Remember this while you check out the article – http://bit.ly/1pcaoWo

Why Do You Take Courses?

For over 30 years I’ve conducted seminars and workshops. It’s been fun, educational, enlightening and, occasionally, depressing. Well, maybe not totally depressing but certainly not fun. Sometimes there are people in sessions who do not want to be there. They were sent and view the time as wasted time. The first question of the day can be, “Will we be here for the full day?”

My response is usually, “We’ll be here until we finish the material.” Inside my head, I’m saying, “Why do you even bother coming if you’re not interested?”

What also goes on inside my head is a process of thinking, “How do I get this person engaged?” As a facilitator, I believe it’s my responsibility to make the material engaging, the session engaging, and the outcome worthwhile for everyone involved.

However, that being said I still like to know why people come to sessions, sometimes of their own choice. So, why do you take courses? If you weren’t required to take courses to retain certificates or licenses, would you choose to go to a webinar, seminar or workshop?

I just attended a webinar from the other side of the world where the facilitator talked about how those of us who give seminars and workshops must change from old paradigms to new ways of presenting material. In an ideal world, how would you like to receive your ongoing education?

It’s all about questions

As someone who started as a journalist, I know the value of great questions. Throughout my career, I’ve focused on asking good questions to move projects forward, to inspire thinking on the part of direct reports and colleagues, and to help me sort out my life and work. It’s always great to read articles that support the value of questions. Check out this article from Fast Company. It’s just a three-minute read – http://bit.ly/1Qgmt2n